Spontaneity Hurts.

Say yes, and you’ll figure it afterwards ~ Tina Fey

Doesn’t work that way for some people, Tina.

It certainly doesn’t work that way for me.

Sometimes it will appear that I am being spontaneous, but the truth is that I will have been thinking about something in my head long before I actually say, ‘Shall we do this today?’ However, this can only apply to me and OH as The Boy needs time to adjust to any changes because he is autistic too.

One problem I’ve always had is having to cope with other people’s spontaneity – such as those who turn up without notice. I’ve had decades of people just turning up unannounced. There have been countless times when I’ve hidden upstairs or in the kitchen to avoid answering the door..

As part of my diagnosis my ex husband wrote a letter about me as, at that point, he’d lived with me the longest. He referenced how I used to do these things and how at the time he thought I was being moody or rude. He noted that every time the door went or the phone rang, I was suddenly elsewhere..

My parents never turned up unannounced. I guess this was because my mother also struggled with unannounced visitors. My mother-in-law, bless her, was different. She was full on neurotypical and as old fashioned as they came. I know without a doubt that she loved me, but I also know that she didn’t understand me. She’d often ask her son why I was so moody, only I wasn’t being ‘moody’. I was struggling to process the change to routine.

In the early years of my first marriage, I was practically a hermit. I struggled with everything that most people do without thinking. Even fetching the milk in was stressful because there was a chance that one of the neighbours would see me and I’d have to speak to or ignore them. It was often the latter. Sometimes because it was easier. Sometimes because the words wouldn’t come out. Hence, I got myself a reputation for being ‘weird’ or ‘stuck up’. I’ve waited hours for neighbours to go in just so I could walk up the street. On especially anxious days, I have cancelled appointments rather than walk past people in my street. Sounds ridiculous, I know, but it’s true.

My mother-in-law had set days where she would come to ours. The routine worked for me. However, sometimes she’d just turn up when I was on my own. She’d peer in through the living room window and rap on the glass. I loved this woman so much but my heart would sink, not because I didn’t want her, but because I wasn’t prepared for her. There was no time to get my head around it and I had no choice but to let her in because no matter how muddled my head was, I would never have left an elderly lady on the doorstep.

A lot of people like to be spontaneous but I’d hazard a guess that the majority who do are neurotypical.

Take Christmas, for example..

Every year, I give OH a list of what I want for Christmas (almost always books) and he always says, ‘We’ll see’. On hearing those words, I become anxious. He has this thing where he likes to ‘keep me guessing’. It’s utterly NT and it drives me FUCKING NUTS!

Every year, I tell him, ‘I don’t like surprises. Please just get me what I’ve asked for’.

Every year he says, ‘We’ll see’.

I’d hoped that my DX would change this and he would understand that surprises stress me, even nice ones.

Last week, I told him that I’d give him my list of books and he replied that I’d be getting something else as well because it made him happy to surprise me.

What’s more important? The pleasure of the giver? Or the distress of the receiver?

I can’t help how I am. I can’t adapt. No matter what I do, I will ALWAYS react negatively to spontaneity.

I get that there has to be compromise in any relationship, let alone a neurotypical/autistic one, but sometimes compromise isn’t possible. In this situation there can be no positive compromise. It can only be that OH does as I ask him or I try and cope with the anxiety in order to make him happy.

An example of spontaneity malfunction from my childhood..

We’d just moved and my life had been turned upside down. That summer, I turned 11 and my mother decided that I was old enough to be sent on errands, whereas before, I’d always gone with my brother. One day she told me to go to the local shop for her. It was a bad day anxiety wise and I had no confidence at all. I reacted badly. However, my mother interpreted my behaviour as being normal for a girl my age. Except that I wasn’t being rude. Or lazy. I was overwhelmed.

How can a trip round to the local shop overwhelm you?

Here’s how.

The request was spontaneous. There was no time for me to process or plan. Mum wanted something from the shop and she wanted it there and then.

The only route to the shop was along a busy main road where the traffic, at the best of times, was loud and unrelenting. Part of pavement narrowed with railings on the roadside and overgrown bushes on the other. It was claustrophobic and forced you into having communicate when people allowed you past or when they thanked you for allowing them past because for all my problems, I have always practiced good manners whenever possible.

The shop itself was half post-office, half grocery shop and it was always busy after around 10am. Mum sent me round at dinnertime – one of it’s busiest times.

What happens to my brain when I’m stressed is that it goes blank. I struggle to process and retain information. I remember standing in the shop with sweat literally pouring out of me – staring at what my mother had written on the piece of paper..

I was looking but I couldn’t see anything..

The noise was deafening. That, combined with the smells of cooked meats and that general grocery shop smell was an assault on my senses. The ‘normal’ thing to have done would have been to ask someone, but that meant communicating and it was beyond my capability at that moment in time. In the end, I walked out of the shop with nothing and went back home feeling useless. It was a feeling I would become familiar with as the years went on. It really bothered me that I couldn’t do the spontaneous thing without my brain malfunctioning. I need to plan. I need to know where everything is, right down to the toilets. I need trial runs to unfamiliar places. I’ve done this with holidays. It’s a part of my autism that I wish I didn’t have but I also know it’s a part of me that will never change.

Spontaneity doesn’t make me feel ‘alive’ like it does with most people. It freaks me out and fucks me up.

Since being formally diagnosed as autistic, a lot of the guilt has left me. How can I beat myself up over something that’s beyond my control? Nor do I feel the need to apologise anymore. I can try and educate people but I can’t make them understand that spontaneity hurts.

Ā Ā I might say yes IF I can figure it out beforehand ~ Me

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

10 thoughts on “Spontaneity Hurts.

  1. My friend’s two children are autistic. It’s extremely frustrating for her because she wants to expose them to different things and they want to stay home, or beg her to go home after 5 minutes. Your piece helps me understand where they’re coming from. Thank you.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Both my wife and I laughed at this at times because we could relate so much.
    Luckily I am able to note the things she likes throughout the year and leading up to Christmas so I think she’s used to getting presents now that she will like. She deals with the surprise side of it well because of that although she also knows that if she just have me a list of get her whatever was on the list and it wouldn’t bother me.
    As for my son I simply ask him what he wants. I only stipulate that he thinks about it rather than being the first thing that comes into his head.
    As for spontaneity we have an agreement at home that spontaneity is always welcome as long as it follows a two week consolation process and one week arrival notice. Doh

    Liked by 1 person

    • I think another side to the surprise gift thing is that I am so specific in what I like, especially with clothing. It has to be cotton and it has to be comfy. I get irritated just at the sight of nylon! I was always the same as a girl. I was OK if I got what I asked for but I would get stressed out by those surprise gifts, like girly toys. The saving grave with stereotypical toys of the 70s was that I got to play with my brother’s guns. šŸ˜‰

      Like

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